Monthly Archives: September 2016

September 29 2016

image

Adam and Amber quietly disappeared from the farm Tuesdsy and announced the birth of a healthy baby girl yesterday. The two are taking some well deserved time away to bond with their new baby. We are anxious for the three of them to get back so we can see the new addition to the family!
Today I counted the jobs going on the farm today. We are back combining the soy beans, Gilbrairh Farm Services arrived at noon to cut silage, straw bales are being rowed and hauled back to the farm ahead of the on going fall field work, Andre pictured sale heifers this afternoon and spent the rest of the day feeding the livestock, I sent some more feed out to the hives and we had a crew working on cattle facility construction and fence repair. So much going on and it all seems routine.

image

September 26 2016

image

I’m Loving these 6 frame Lewis nucs. Next year I’m pulling my 5 frames nucs out and I plan on using them exclusively as breeders. The 6 framers will be used as my nuc project. 6 frames seems to be that solution I’ve been searching for.

September 24 2016

image

Rainy foggy drizzly day today. It pretty much shut the farm down except for some daily cattle chores (done by Dad). This morning I moved a few hundred honey boxes out to another farm yard for storage. A few odds and ends around the honey house and then I lounged around the house with the kids and watched baseball. I’m starting to eat supper at 6 with the family again. It feels good to be whinding down the season.
I slipped into a nearby Beeyard this morning to tap some pails to see how the syrup is going down. Heavy drizzle and these hives were more active than I thought they would be.

September 21 2016

image

Awesome soybean crop this year

image

Random assessments show promising hive populations.  For some reason the hives I show here failed to workout the outside foundation’s out sides…  The bees better not look that far out in March!  We will finish the second round of feeding tomorrow.  I’ll give them 10 days under that pail then we will strip the pails and prime the last bit of feed into them through the open feeders. Honey house maintenance and winter prep is underway.  September will pretty much end most honey work on the farm.  With the harvest nearing the end, a shift towards the cattle farm is near.

September 20 2016

image

As I have been yapping about previously, I’ve been Dabbling with fall stimulus. I’m so encouraged with this project. 10 days ago this yard had no brood present because the queen prematurely shutdown due to a lack of forage in the area (and I had not caught the problem soon enough).
After pulling frames to add space, flashing the yard with syrup and feeding a 1/2 lb. patty protein supplement, each nuc now holds a football sized brood nest over three frames. Today we started bulk feeding to pack the syrup in around the nest to ensure enough syrup will be stored away before the cold sets in. The vitality of this yard has made a 180 degree turn since 10 days ago.

September 19 2016


image

We sparked up some brood rearing in one of my nuc yards to see what happens.  This yard shut down too early because of a lack of food.  Last week we pulled frames to add space, flashed some syrup at them and stimulated egg laying with dry open fed Ultrabee and 1/2 lbs of my patty recipe.   The nucs are back brood rearing, tomorrow we will set some feed onto this yard and pack syrup around the nest before the cold weather sets in.  I have another single yard also sitting on patties.  They were fed up Mid August to restart brood rearing after being shut down in a derth.  We set the second pail on them today and the yard looks fantastic.   I’ll see how these two yards, roughly 125 hives, come out of winter.

I recieved my nosema counts today and my apiary counts came back 0.5m spore count.  Just for interest sake I ran a few yards with a fumagillin syrup treatment.  I also have a few Thymol wafers given to me by a beekeeper which im going to use to see how the bees respond to.   I’ve been without fumagillin treatment in most of my yards for 1 1/2 years now But with a few yards that have had treatment during this past spring.  I’m currently tracking all the groups of hives to see if it all means anything.  From what it seems, summer has wiped the slate this year unlike other years.  GOOD NEWS,

September 17 2016

image

Our fall pastures, lush with growth. We under seed our pastures with a scattering of clovers. Proper rotational grazing promotes an abundance of bee forage year long while the pasture grasses receive the benefit of added nitrogen and improved soil structure. This pasture was a buzz this morning.

Small actions, huge results

image

Waiting on my next load.

September 16 2016

image

The first week takes down the first pail. Anything empty after the first week gets another full one. The rest get to work on what they have and maybe another gallon later.  I’ll weigh random hives throughout the apiary later to be sure they have what they need.